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Multi-Stage Basin Development and Hydrocarbon Accumulations: A Review of the Sichuan Basin at Eastern Margin of the Tibetan Plateau

Shugen Liu1, Bin Deng1*, Luba Jansa2, Zhiwu Li1, Wei Sun1, Guozhi Wang1, Zhili Luo1, Ziquan Yong1
1. State Key Laboratory of Oil and Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059, China 2. Geological Survey of Canada-Atlantic, Dartmouth, N.S. Canada

Sichuan Basin is one of the uppermost petroliferous basins in China. It experienced three evolutionary phases which were marine carbonate platform (Ediacaran to Late Triassic), Indosinian-Yanshanian orogeny foreland basin (Late Triassic to Late Cretaceous) and uplift and tectonic modification (Late Cretaceous to Quaternary). The present-day tectonics of the Sichuan basin and its periphery are characterized by three basic elementstopography, basement type and surface structure, and two settings (plate margin and interior). Therefore, be subdivided into five units which have different structure and tectonic history. The basin contains five different sets of source rocks with thickness up to 2 500 m. These source rocks were well preserved due to the presence of Mid-Lower Triassic evaporites (>~200 m) and thick terrestrial sediments filling in the Indosinian-Yanshanian foreland basin (>3 000 m). The uplift and erosion since Late Cretaceous has significant influence on cross-strata migration and accumulation of oil and gas. The multi-phase evolution of the basin and its superimposed tectonic elements, good petroleum geologic conditions and diverse petroleum systems reveal its bright exploration prospects.

Keywords:multi-stage basin, hydrocarbon accumulation, Sichuan basin, eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau

DOI:
10.1007/s12583-017-0904-8
CLC number:
U469.72
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