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Seawater temperature and dissolved oxygen over the past 500 million years

HaijunSong1*, Paul B. Wignall2, HuyueSong1, Xu Dai1, DaoliangChu1
1State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, China;2School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS29JT, UK

ABSTRACT:Ocean temperature and dissolved oxygen concentrations are critical factors that control ocean productivity, carbon and nutrient cycles, and marine habitat. However,the evolution of these two factors in the geologic past are still unclear. Here, we use a new oxygen isotope database to establish the sea surfacetemperature(SST) curve in the past 500 million years. The database is composed of22,796 oxygen isotope values of phosphatic and calcareous fossils. The result shows two prolonged cooling events happened in the late Paleozoic and late Cenozoic, coinciding with two major ice ages indicated by continental glaciation data, and seven global warming eventsthat happened in the late Cambrian, Silurian-Devonian transition, late Devonian, Early Triassic, Toarcian, Late Cretaceous, and Paleocene-Eocene transition.The SSTs during these warming periods are about 5–30 °C higher than the present-day level.Oxygen contents of shallow seawater are calculated from temperature, salinity, and atmospheric oxygen. The results show that major dissolved oxygen valleys of surface seawater coincide with global warming events and ocean anoxic events. We propose that the combined effect of temperature and dissolved oxygen account for the long-term evolution of global oceanic redox state during the Phanerozoic.


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Keywords:sea surfacetemperature, global warming, ocean anoxic event, dissolved oxygen, Phanerozoic

DOI:
10.1007/s12583-018-1002-2
CLC number:
U469.72
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